The History of Muay Thai

 Muay Thai is referred to as “The Art of Eight Limbs”; and using eight points of contact the body mimics weapons of war. The hands become the sword and dagger; the shins and forearms were hardened in training to act as armor against blows, and the elbow to fell opponents like a heavy mace or hammer; the legs and knees became the axe and staff. The body operated as one unit. The knees and elbows constantly searching and testing for an opening while grappling and trying to spin an enemy to the ground for the kill

The King of Thailand is an avid fan of Muay Thai. Since being crowned its popularity has grown more than in any other era in history.

high kick muay thai
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The Sukhothai Era

In 1238 (Buddhist years), the first Thai army was created in the northern city of Sukhothai, Siam being its capital. The recorded history shows that a need to defend the capital city was spawned by many wars being fought between neighbouring tribes and kingdoms. The Siamese army was created to protect the government and its inhabitants within the city and surrounding villages. Soldiers were taught hand-to-hand combat and how to use weapons, as well as how to use the entire body as a weapon. Their training is what eventually evolved into Muay Thai and Krabi Krabong.

Learning the military arts or “Muay Thai” became engrained in the culture of the early Siamese people. With the constant threat of war, training centers slowly began to appear throughout the kingdom. These were the first Muay Thai camps. Young men practiced the art form for various reasons: self-defense, exercise, discipline; monks even instructed at many Buddhist temples, passing down knowledge and history from one generation to the next.

muay thai ranking system
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As Muay Thai became popular with the poor and common people, it also became a required staple for the high-class and royalty. The two sons of King Phokhun Sri In Tharatit, the first King of Sukhothai, were sent to learn at the Samakorn training center. The common idea was that good warriors made brave leaders and this would prepare them as future rulers of the kingdom.
The Krungsri Ayutthaya Era

With many wars being fought between the developing countries of Thailand, Burma (Myanmar) and Cambodia, the development of large armies became necessary to protect and ensure the survival of the Thai kingdom. Young men were trained in warfare at training centers throughout the country, devoting themselves to learning hand-to-hand combat, the sword, staff and stick (“Krabi Krabong”). Phudaisawan Center for swords and pole arms became the most famous of the these training centers and was considered to be the eras equivalent of a college or university education.

muay thai clinch techniques
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The Era of King Naresuan

King Naresuan loved Muay Thai and fighting competitions. He would eventually become a Muay Thai legend, calling upon the men who had been beaten and displaced by the Burmese warriors to become scouts and jungle warfare soldiers that would eventually liberate Thailand from it’s Burmese occupants around 1600.
The Era of King Narai

During this era Muay Thai became a national sport, developing the fundamental traditions that would remain the same for the next 400 years. The Mongkong (headband) and pa-pra-jiat (armband) were both introduced and the first “ring” was made by laying a rope on the ground in a square or circle as a designated fighting area.

The fighters used hemp ropes and threads as hand coverings which wrapped around the hands and forearms. A thick, starchy liquid would sometimes be used to bind the threads and make the striking surface harder. Now, 400 years later, TWINS is Thailand’s #1 Muay Thai equipment manufacturer.

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